Youth Transitional Pipeline

Man and woman looking at computer

Youth Transitional Pipeline (YTP) is designed to bring for youths and young adults who have disabilities into the workplace where they can learn about various career opportunities. Through YTP, for youths and young adults are paired with a career professional to learn what it means to work in that field or occupation – observe a typical workday; identify necessary skills; and learn about possible internships or employment prospects.


There are several ways to participate in YTP:

  • One-on-one mentor for a youth or young adult
    • The mentoring component of the program will pair individual youth and young adults with leaders from the business community for one-on-one mentoring. Mentoring is a supported alternative employment model that can change career opportunities and employment, and thus the independence of youth and young adults who have disabilities. Mentoring has the potential to increase independent living skills, enhance self-esteem and motivation, increase interest in continuing education and the knowledge of how to do so, and increase interest in having a job and the knowledge of how to do so (Moccia, Schumacher, Hazel, Veron & Dessler, 1989).
  • One-on-One job shadowing
    • YTP will match participating youth and young adults with job shadow opportunities with various employers in the community. Job shadowing allows youth and young adults to experience first-hand what a job is like – the daily tasks and challenges, workplace environment, and the skills and knowledge needed to do the job.
  • Internships
    • Internships can be the next step after job shadowing to give youth and young adults who have disabilities insight into the working world by actually becoming a part of an organization and performing tasks to support it. The specifics of each internship will vary depending on the intern and the hosting employer, however all opportunities allow the student to gain first-hand experience. It also provides the hosting employer with insight into how to work with and support people who have disabilities.

Mentoring is invaluable and beneficial for both the mentor and student, advancing career development and personal growth.

To participate in YTP or to learn more, please complete the Mentor Application form. If you have any additional questions, please do not hesitate to contact us. We hope you will take advantage of this mentoring opportunity and join us in creating a diverse workforce for youths and young adults who have disabilities.

FAQ about Youth Transition Pipeline

  1. As a mentor, what will I gain from being a part of YTP?
    A mentor is a person who through support, counsel, friendship, reinforcement and constructive example helps another person to reach his or her work and life goals.
    Some of the benefits of being a mentor include: increased self-esteem, a sense of accomplishment, creation of networks of volunteers, insight into childhood, adolescence and young adulthood, increased patience and improved supervisory skills.
  2. Why should my organization become involved in YTP?
    YTP offers employers an opportunity to engage an untapped workforce of citizens who have disabilities and develop a pipeline of talent into their organization. YTP is also a way for organizations to help constituents who have disabilities develop confidence about their own employability, to recruit short- and long-term interns/employees and to demonstrate positive leadership in their communities. YTP is a truly unique program that allows companies to actively engage in issues affecting citizens today and the business community in a positive way.
  3. Why is YTP important?
    YTP allows employers to connect with people who have disabilities outside the typical hiring context, while at the same time exposing all people who have disabilities to new possibilities of employment, exciting career possibilities and future educational opportunities. YTP allows youth and young adults to gain a first-hand look at careers they are interested in pursuing with experienced mentors in the field. By working with mentors, youth and young adults will be able to develop interview and job skills needed to be successful in their field. In addition, YTP educate employers on how to make the workplace more accessible for employees who have disabilities and the value of hiring people who have disabilities.
  4. What are the goals of YTP?
    The goals of YTP are to promote disability as a central component of diversity recruitment for a more inclusive workforce, dispel employer fears about hiring people who have disabilities, increase confidence among students and job seekers who have disabilities, enhance internship and employment opportunities for people who have disabilities and serve as a launch pad to promote a year-round, national effort to foster mentoring and career exploration opportunities.
  5. Who do I contact to find out more about YTP?
    To find out more about Youth Transition Pipeline, please contact Nicholas Love at nicholasl@ability360.org
  6. I want to be a mentor for YTP, but I am uncertain how to make my job accessible to people with certain disabilities. Should I still apply to become a mentor?
    Yes, there are many ways to accommodate people who have disabilities. For specific questions on making your workplace accessible, please contact Nicholas Love at nicholasl@ability360.org. However, the best way to find out how to accommodate a person who has a disability is to speak to them directly to find what they need to be successful.
  7. What will my organization gain from being a part of YTP?
    YTP offers employers an opportunity to engage an untapped workforce of citizens who have disabilities, to help constituents who have disabilities develop confidence about their own employability, to recruit short-term and long-term interns/employees and to demonstrate positive leadership in their communities.
  8. What are the benefits of employing people who have disabilities?
    There are many benefits to hiring people who have disabilities. Hiring people who have disabilities ranked third as an indicator of a company’s commitment to social justice, behind protecting the environment and offering health insurance to all. Additionally:
    a. 91 percent of those that have worked with a person with a disability said that person’s job performance was “Very Good” or “Good.”
    b. 98 percent of those served were “Very Satisfied” or “Satisfied” with services received. (Center for Social Development and Education, Jan. 31, 2006).